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Blog

27
Mar 2017

Management Tip of the Month: Fly Control by Dan Bakker, Dairy Production Specialist

By Adrian VMC

It may seem early yet but it is time to start thinking about fly control plans for this coming summer. Early control of flies before they are a problem is critical to your program’s success. There are a few things that are key factors to a successful program across all farms: Read More


27
Mar 2017

Ketosis Treatment: Why Am I Giving This Stuff?

By Dr. Sara Barber

Over the past several months, I have been asked many times about ketosis treatments. It is important to understand the basics of what ketosis is and how each part of the treatment works. We don’t have to be fancy when we treat disease, just effective. Read More


27
Mar 2017

Mycoplasma Bovis

By Dr. Erika Nagorske

Our very first VMC Calf School was a great success earlier this month. We had good attendance and I truly enjoyed interacting with producers in a continuing education setting. Read More


16
Feb 2017

Cattlemen to Cattlemen with Dr. Dorcey

By Brian Grimord

Click the link below to watch Dr. Brian Dorcey's feature on NCBA's Cattlemen to Cattlemen episode! Read More


08
Feb 2017

Management Tip of the Month: Calf Raising by Dan Bakker, Dairy Production Specialist

By Adrian VMC

Raising baby calves can be a very rewarding job but it can also be very frustrating. It does not always need to be difficult, however I think every calf raising program has had its challenges at some point. There are many different housing and grouping systems that are successfully raising calves. I believe that the following items are key to having a consistently successful program: Read More


08
Feb 2017

The Dairy Cow Workaholic

By Dr. Sara Barber

Dr. Nigel Cook from the University of Wisconsin describes the dairy cow as a workaholic because she spends her adult life functioning at 3x her maintenance energy cost. Humans would only accomplish this with extensive exercise like jogging six or more hours per day. Since these hard-working cows put my exercise and energy needs to shame, let’s look at what she needs during the day to be successful. Read More


08
Feb 2017

VMC Dairy Calf School

By Dr. Erika Nagorske

The VMC is excited to announce their first Calf School coming up March 8 & 9th. As a clinic, we have noticed there is a lack of calf management education available to our producers and we would like to bring that to our clients. The Calf School will consist of two days hosted by Dr. Barber, Dan and I. There will be both English and Spanish sessions available. Read More


27
Dec 2016

Dairy Calf Winter Management

By Dr. Erika Nagorske

Although it hasn’t felt like it for long, winter is finally here to stay. As colder
temperatures approach, we need to keep in mind management changes for our
baby calves. Energy requirements increase for calves starting at 50°F. If we do not
offset the increased energy requirement, they begin using their milk/feed intake to
keep warm, instead of to grow and stay healthy. Below are a few recommendations
we have to help with the increased energy requirement calves face during winter. Read More


27
Dec 2016

Management Tip of the Month: Cold Weather and Teat Condition by Dan Bakker, Dairy Production Specialist

By Adrian VMC

We have had our first taste of frigid temperatures and the risk has increased for damaged, frozen, chapped
and hyperkeratosis on teats. Wind chill is the biggest risk factor for teat damage, especially as the wind chill
drops below zero. At -25 wind chill, teats can freeze in under one minute! Each farms risk for winter teat
damage is different and is affected by the following factors: Read More


27
Dec 2016

The Changing Face of Coronavirus

By Dr. Sara Barber

Last winter set a record, the record for the most cases of calf coronavirus disease in my veterinary career (16
years if you are counting). Historically coronavirus infection in calves has been characterized by severe
diarrhea and dehydration in calves 7-14 days of age. Coronavirus essentially destroys most of the absorptive
cells in the calf’s intestine so they cannot absorb milk or electrolytes very well. The damage is so severe that
many calves will die within 48 hours of the initial diarrhea, especially if they are cold or are not treated
aggressively with a well-balanced electrolyte. Coronavirus is typically seen more frequently in the winter
because it loves cool, moist environments. Facilities can be harder to disinfect between calves in the winter
and the calves are also temperature stressed, reducing their ability to fight disease. Read More


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