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Welcome to Prairie Livestock Supply

Prairie Livestock Supply, Worthington, MN, offers a full range of livestock supplies, nutritional programs, and health and production management consultation. Our experienced sales team and affiliation with the Veterinary Medical Center of Worthington give us the knowledge and contacts to guide you in the right direction. We service what we sell, and offer free delivery to most areas.We specialize in Beef & Dairy, Bovine, Ovine, and Equine care.

Shop on our online store for the latest deals and have your products delivered right to your door!  Be sure to check back often to see advice from our Veterinarians in the Prairie Livestock Supply Healthbeat. 

  


Latest News

27
Dec 2016

Dairy Calf Winter Management

By Dr. Erika Nagorske

Although it hasn’t felt like it for long, winter is finally here to stay. As colder
temperatures approach, we need to keep in mind management changes for our
baby calves. Energy requirements increase for calves starting at 50°F. If we do not
offset the increased energy requirement, they begin using their milk/feed intake to
keep warm, instead of to grow and stay healthy. Below are a few recommendations
we have to help with the increased energy requirement calves face during winter. Read More


27
Dec 2016

Management Tip of the Month: Cold Weather and Teat Condition by Dan Bakker, Dairy Production Specialist

By Adrian VMC

We have had our first taste of frigid temperatures and the risk has increased for damaged, frozen, chapped
and hyperkeratosis on teats. Wind chill is the biggest risk factor for teat damage, especially as the wind chill
drops below zero. At -25 wind chill, teats can freeze in under one minute! Each farms risk for winter teat
damage is different and is affected by the following factors: Read More


27
Dec 2016

The Changing Face of Coronavirus

By Dr. Sara Barber

Last winter set a record, the record for the most cases of calf coronavirus disease in my veterinary career (16
years if you are counting). Historically coronavirus infection in calves has been characterized by severe
diarrhea and dehydration in calves 7-14 days of age. Coronavirus essentially destroys most of the absorptive
cells in the calf’s intestine so they cannot absorb milk or electrolytes very well. The damage is so severe that
many calves will die within 48 hours of the initial diarrhea, especially if they are cold or are not treated
aggressively with a well-balanced electrolyte. Coronavirus is typically seen more frequently in the winter
because it loves cool, moist environments. Facilities can be harder to disinfect between calves in the winter
and the calves are also temperature stressed, reducing their ability to fight disease. Read More


01
Dec 2016

What's New in Calf Pain Management, by Dr. Chelsea Stewart

By Adrian VMC

In recent years the topic of pain management in animal agriculture has been a mainstay of discussion. Pain management is not just for surgical procedures anymore, research is continually finding diseases that benefit from pain management. Lameness, respiratory disease and calving are just some events that could potentially benefit from pain management. Read More


01
Dec 2016

Postpartum Slump

By Dr. Erika Nagorske

As many of us know, cows face an extreme transition challenge after calving. We alter our management efforts to reduce the effect of this slump, therefore allowing cows to transition properly, produce more milk, stay healthy, and get pregnant faster. Read More